“Hazardous Locations” Not Confined to Article 500 Installations

0
50

If you have been an inspector for any length of time, you already know that “hazardous locations” often exist in other than Article 500 installations. The following four photographs demonstrate this situation.And yet there are workers who will attempt repairs or service with no idea of the personal hazard they are exposed to. Safe working practice would require that the service be disconnected in the utility company’s manhole with the loss of power to all the tenants—and that is unthinkable.

How is it that the power company can increase the available fault current and is not obligated to advise their customers of the increase?

Photo 1. Old multi-use building, not expected to be a hazardous location.

Photo 1. Old multi-use building, not expected to be a hazardous location.

Photo 2. Old service is 50 or 60+ years old, with some modern meter enclosures.

Photo 2. Old service is 50 or 60+ years old, with some modern meter enclosures.

Photo 2. Old service is 50 or 60+ years old, with some modern meter enclosures.

Photo 3. Original 200-amp service circuit breaker—looks okay.

Photo 4. Remove the circuit breaker cover, view corroded line-side terminations—decide that operating this CB in not in my personal interest, as now we are standing in front of a hazardous location per NFPA 70E based on present available fault current of 58,700 amps!

Photo 4. Remove the circuit breaker cover, view corroded line-side terminations—decide that operating this CB in not in my personal interest, as now we are standing in front of a hazardous location per NFPA 70E based on present available fault current of 58,700 amps!

Views All Time
Views All Time
316
Views Today
Views Today
1
SHARE
Previous articleWhat Hath the 2011 NEC Wrought for PV?
Next articleElectrical Equipment Vaults
Andre "Andy" Cartal has been a member of the IAEI since 1967, serving as secretary of the Skyland Division, South Jersey Chapter, chairman of the New Jersey Chapter, Eastern Section president and international president. He represented the IAEI on CMP-12, is a member of Underwriters Laboratories Electrical Council, and is a life member of the NFPA. Retired after 50 years of service from the Middle Department Inspection Agency, Andy is a past recipient of the President's Medal of Honor and the Inspector of the Year Award from the State of New Jersey.