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Healthcare Systems are commonly some of the electrical equipment requires in the CE Code that often get confused.
This is a continuation of the article that appeared in a past edition of IAEI New magazines. After the publication of that article, I received several new comments in respect to the Canadian Electrical Code (CE Code) requirements and regarding the National Building Code of Canada (NBC) provisions for application and installation criteria for electrically connected life safety systems. Let’s look...
ESFI Twelve Holiday Safety Tips
Tis the season – to celebrate safely! This isn’t just the time of year that we eat more than usual, it’s also the time when we have the most household accidents and fires. [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3PA7-XhVO8] To help make sure your holidays don’t go from merry to scary, remember these Twelve Holiday Safety Tips. Keep decorations at least three feet away from heat...
Issue: May/June 2020 Deadline: February 07, 2020 May is Electrical Safety Month! To highlight this important month, we are looking for writers to write about workplace safety, specifically NFPA 70E. Write about protecting workers outdoors or proper personal protective equipment (PPE) in the workplace. From ladder safety to arc-flash calculations, we're interested in hearing from you. Have a case study? Submit...
The Georgia Department of Community Affairs has adopted eight new mandatory State Minimum Standard Codes with Georgia State Amendments. The updated codes will go into effect on January 1, 2020. The updated codes and amendments are as follows: 2018 International Building Code with Georgia Amendments 2015 International Energy Conservation Code with Georgia Amendments 2018 International Fire Code with no Amendments 2018...
Downed power lines after winter storm. Courtesy of PSNH
Electrical hazards quickly multiply for workers involved in cleanup and recovery efforts following major disasters and weather emergencies. Life-threatening danger exists around downed and low-hanging electrical wires, which can still be energized following a storm. Tree Care Contact with electricity is one of the leading causes of death for tree care workers. Here are just a few examples of electrocutions that...
Flooded homes. Be careful after a storm when examining flooded water-damaged electrical equipment. Courtesy of FEMA
Flooding forces home and business owners to ask many difficult questions about water-damaged electrical equipment in their homes and businesses, such as: Can I use appliances after they dry out? Are circuit breakers and fuses safe to use? Will I need to replace electrical wiring? Floodwater contaminants can create serious fire hazards if electrical wiring and equipment have been submerged...
Cord-and-Plug-connected Health Care Facility Outlet Assemblies. Courtesy of Hubbell Incorporated
Question. I know Certified (Listed) relocatable power taps are not intended for use in health care facilities and that Certified (Listed) medical carts or equipment may incorporate relocatable power taps when the equipment to be plugged into the power tap is restricted to the items identified on the Certified (Listed) medical cart. Is there another Certified (Listed) multiple receptacle...
Industrial Plant after Flooding. Study NFPA 70B for recovery options
Key Steps to Help Electricians Assess Whether Damaged Industrial Electrical Systems Should be Repaired or Replaced Natural disasters can strike in an instant and leave us devastated when it comes to the life, both professionally and personally, that we have built up over the years. In the blink of an eye, our entire world can be uprooted and turned upside...
Water-Damaged Electrical Equipment
Water and electricity do not mix. Follow this guide to quickly see what equipment must be replaced and which electronics may be reconditioned. Any water-damaged equipment even if thoroughly dried will pose serious long-term safety and fire risk if not properly reconditioned. ESFI recommends that the evaluation of water-damaged electrical equipment be conducted by qualified electricians. Floodwaters contaminated with chemicals,...
How To Start an Electrical Business
If you're an electrician, there's a good chance you're thinking about starting your own business. We get it. You've finished your apprenticeship, gained lots of experience, and now you're ready to jump into the world of entrepreneurship. As a business owner, you'll gain flexibility, freedom, and reliable income. But starting a business can be challenging. If you're a first-time business owner,...