The Questions

To play this game, you need a sharp eye, a quick mind and a 2017 National Electrical Code book.
(Fill-in-the-blank questions are looking for the exact word(s) used in the NEC.)

1) GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets not exceeding __________ volts that supply boat hoists installed in dwelling unit locations.
A) 120
B) 125
C) 150
D) 240

2) Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protected receptacles are not required where replacements are made at receptacle outlets that are required to be so protected elsewhere in this Code.
A) True
B) False

3) GFCI protection shall be provided for lighting outlets not exceeding __________ volts installed in crawl spaces.
A) 120
B) 125
C) 150
D) 240

4) Choose all of the following appliances that specifically require GFCI protection in the NEC:
A) Drinking water coolers
B) Water heaters
C) Vending Machines
D) Toaster ovens

5) For dwelling unit GFCIs, when determining the distance from receptacles, the distance shall be measured as the shortest path the cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, or fixed barrier, or passing through a door, doorway, or window.
A) True
B) False

6) All 15- and 20-ampere, single-phase, 125-volt receptacles located within __________ of the inside walls of a pool shall be protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter.
A) 1.5 m (5 ft)
B) 1.83 m (6 ft)
C) 3.0 m (10 ft)
D) 6.0 m (20 ft)

7) In other than dwelling units, all single-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 50 amperes or less and three-phase receptacles rated 150 volts to ground or less, 100 amperes or less installed in kitchens shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
A) True
B) False

8) GFCI protection shall be provided for outlets that supply dishwashers installed in __________ locations.
A) Wet
B) Kitchen
C) Commercial
D) Dwelling unit

9) Ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel shall not be required for receptacles installed in those critical care (__________) spaces where the toilet and basin are installed within the patient room.
A) Category 1
B) Category 2
C) Category 3
D) Category 4

10)  Outlets supplying pool pump motors connected to single-phase, __________-volt through __________-volt branch circuits, whether by receptacle or by direct connection, shall be provided with ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel.
A) 120, 208
B) 120, 240
C) 120, 480
D) 240, 480

The Answers:

1) D, 240. Section 210.8(C) requires GFCI protection for all receptacles 240 volts or less in dwelling unit locations where the receptacle supplies a boat hoist. Other receptacles installed near boat hoist locations that are 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere are likely to require GFCI protection under 210.8(A) or 555.19(B)(1).

2) B, False. Section 406.4(D)(3) requires that replacement receptacles must be GFCI protected where such protection is required elsewhere in the Code. If the installation did not originally require GFCI-protected receptacles, the replacement must still provide GFCI protection. Even in non-grounding type systems, GFCI protection is easily provided for replacement receptacles since Class A GFCI devices do not require an equipment grounding conductor to function.

3) A, 120. This is a new requirement added in Section 210.8(E) for the 2017 NEC. The substantiation provided with the public input requesting this protection described the death of a worker in a crawl space who came into contact with a broken lamp and was electrocuted. This requirement applies to all crawl spaces, dwelling unit or non-dwelling unit.

4)  A and C, Drinking water coolers and Vending machines. Section 422.5 consolidated requirements for GFCI protection of appliances that previously appeared in several distinct sections of Article 422 Appliances. The new section includes which appliances specifically require GFCI protection in (A) and how they are to be protected in (B).

5) A, True. In 210.8(A), language was added to clarify how to determine if a receptacle requires GFCI protection when a distance is specified in the requirement.

6) D, 6.0 m (20 ft). This requirement is found in Section 680.22(A)(4), and it applies to the receptacle required in (A)(1), permitted in (A)(2), and all other receptacles that might be found within 20 feet of the inside walls of the pool. Measurements are taken as directed in 680.22(A)(5) by determining the shortest path the supply cord of an appliance connected to the receptacle would follow without piercing a floor, wall, ceiling, doorway with hinged or sliding door, window opening, or other effective permanent barrier.

7) A, True. This requirement is found in 210.8(B)(4) for kitchens. The language in 210.8(B) includes significantly expanded voltage and current rating limitations for receptacle GFCI protection for the listed items. Instead of only applying to 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere single-phase receptacles, it now applies to all single-phase receptacles that are 50 amps or less and have a voltage to ground of 150 volts or less. It also applies to all three-phase receptacles that are 100 amps or less and have a voltage to ground of 150 volts or less.

8) D, Dwelling unit. This requirement is found in 210.8(D) and remained unchanged from the language that was added in the 2014 NEC. The GFCI requirement was added based on information provided to the code-making panel indicating that modern electronically controlled dishwashers could fail in a manner that presented an increased risk of electrical shock.

9) A, Category 1.  Section 517.21 is found in Article 517 Health Care Facilities. In the 2017 NEC, numbered categories were assigned to critical care, general care, support, and basic care spaces. These categories (1 through 4), came from NFPA 99 Health Care Facilities Code. Other than the addition of the Category 1 designation, the language in 517.21 remained unchanged in the 2017 NEC and provides an exception from the normal GFCI requirements for certain receptacles that are found within the critical care space, even if the location would also fit the definition of a bathroom and normally require GFCI protection under 210.8.

10) B, 120, 240. Section 680.21(C) is found in Part II Permanently Installed Pools of Article 680 Swimming Pools, Fountains, and Similar Installations. Along with the General requirements found in (A) and the requirements for double insulated pool pumps found in (B), this requirement for GFCI protection applies to any pool pump motor that is connected by receptacle or direct connection and operates at voltages between 120 volts through 240 volts.


Christel Hunter is director of codes and standards for Cerro Wire. Chris is a senior associate member of IAEI and serves as a board member for the Southern Nevada Chapter of IAEI, the IEEE Standards Association Standards Board, and the Las Vegas Section of IEEE. Chris also serves on NEC CMP-6. Chris is a Certified Standards Professional, Master Electrician, and LEED Accredited Professional.

Randy Hunter is an instructor and consultant specializing in electrical code and installations, and co-owner of Hunter Technical Services. He holds twelve inspections certifications from IAEI, ICC and IAPMO. He is the IAEI Southwestern Section secretary and Southern Nevada IAEI Chapter president. Randy has been a master electrician since 1988.

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Christel Hunter is director of codes and standards for Cerro Wire. Chris is a senior associate member of IAEI and serves as a board member for the Southern Nevada Chapter of IAEI and the Las Vegas Section of IEEE. Chris also serves on NEC CMP-6 and CMP-7, the CE Code Part I committee and Sections 4 and 12 subcommittees, and many other industry committees. She is a certified standards professional, master electrician, and LEED accredited professional. Randy Hunter has over thirty years’ experience in the electrical industry including working in the government, contracting and manufacturing sectors. He is an instructor and consultant specializing in electrical code and installations, and co-owner of Hunter Technical Services. He holds twelve inspections certifications from IAEI, ICC and IAPMO. He is the IAEI Southwestern Section secretary, Southern Nevada IAEI Chapter president, former principal member on NEC CMP-6 and CMP-17, voting member of UL 1563 (Electric Spas, Equipment Assemblies, and Associated Equipment), and a former member of the IAPMO Product Certification Committee and Standards Review Committee. Randy has served on several Southern Nevada local code committees and electrical licensing committees and has been a master electrician since 1988. Prior to that, he designed and built computer numerically controlled (CNC) machine tools.

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